Therapeutic Modalities

About Therapeutic Modalities

  • Play Therapy

    • Play therapy is a form of therapy primarily geared toward children. A child is encouraged to explore life events that may have an effect on current circumstances, in a manner and pace of the child's choosing, primarily through play but also through language. Play therapy can help individuals communicate, explore repressed thoughts and emotions, address unresolved trauma, and experience personal growth and is widely viewed as an important, effective, and developmentally appropriate mental health treatment.

  • Attachment-Based Therapy

    • Primarily, a type of family therapy in which aims to help a parent and a child repair ruptures in their relationship and work to develop or rebuild an emotionally secure relationship.

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

    • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a therapy that is based on the way that individuals perceive a situation is more closely connected to their reaction than the situation itself. One important part of CBT is changing unhelpful thinking and behavior that lead to enduring improvement in mood and functioning.

  • Narrative Therapy

    • In narrative therapy, the events that occur over time in a person's life are viewed as stories, some of which stand out as more significant or more fateful than others. These significant stories, usually stemming from negative events, can ultimately shape one's identity. In this therapy, clients see how they are the experts regarding their own life and, as such, can uncover the dreams, values, goals, and skills that define who they really are, separate from their problems.

  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

    • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral treatment. It emphasizes individual psychotherapy and group skills training classes to help people learn and use new skills and strategies to develop a life that they experience as worth living. DBT skills include skills for mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness.

  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

    • Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) teaches mindfulness skills to help individuals live and behave in ways consistent with personal values. ACT helps individuals recognize ways in which their attempts to suppress, manage, and control emotional experiences create challenges. By recognizing and addressing these challenges, individuals can become better able to make room for values-based actions that support well-being.

  • Developmental Therapy

    • Developmental Therapy is a form of therapy that focuses on integration of conceptual skills, motor skills, language skills, and social-emotional skills.

  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

    • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is a modified form of cognitive therapy that incorporates mindfulness practices such as meditation and breathing exercises.

  • Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

    • An evidence-based treatment model designed to assist children, adolescents, and their families in overcoming the negative effects of a traumatic experience. This method has been proven effective for treatment after multiple traumas or a single traumatic event.

  • Person Centered Therapy

    • A non-directive form of talk therapy; it allows the client to lead the conversation and does not attempt to steer the client in any way. Its approach rests on one vital quality: unconditional positive regard. This means that the therapist refrains from judging the client for any reason, providing a source of complete acceptance and support.

  • Family Systems Therapy

    • Family systems therapy is a form of psychotherapy that helps individuals resolve their problems in the context of their family units, where many issues are likely to begin. One of the most important premises of family systems therapy is that what happens to one member of a family happens to everyone in the family.